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From Evidence to Scholarship
TRANSFORMING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH IN THE DIGITAL AGE

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Wednesday, March 14
 

5:30pm

6:00pm

Reception and Dinner
Welcome and remarks from Nigel Nicholson, Walter Mintz Professor of Classics and Dean of the Faculty at Reed College. 

Wednesday March 14, 2018 6:00pm - 8:30pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

8:30pm

Shuttle bus from Reed to Mark Spencer
Wednesday March 14, 2018 8:30pm - 9:00pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address
 
Thursday, March 15
 

8:00am

8:15am

Light breakfast, coffee and tea
Pastries, muffins, fruit, and mini frittatas

Thursday March 15, 2018 8:15am - 9:00am
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

9:00am

Opening Plenary: Re-imagining the Scope of Our Work
Laurie Allen is the Director for Digital Scholarship at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. She and her colleagues collaborate on new forms of scholarship to support campus-wide open access publishing, data curation & management, digital humanities, and mapping and geospatial data efforts. A native of Philadelphia, she also serves as Research Director for Monument Lab, a public art and civic research project in Philadelphia. In late 2016, Allen and colleagues in the Penn Libraries helped start Data Refuge by teaming up with the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities in an effort to help protect copies of federal environmental and climate data.  Before joining the Penn Libraries, Laurie was the Coordinator for Digital Scholarship and Research at Haverford College. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Philosophy from Bard College, and a Master's of Library and Information Science from Simmons College.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Director for Digital Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania Libraries


Thursday March 15, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
PAB 320

10:00am

Coffee Break
Coffee available in foyer

Thursday March 15, 2018 10:00am - 10:15am
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

10:15am

Two Sessions: Undergraduate MVPs: The Modernist Versions Project, Digital Humanities & Open Education Resources ~|~ Connecting Text and Data: A Collaborative Teaching Approach to a Literary Network Analysis Project for Undergraduates
Undergraduate MVPs: The Modernist Versions Project, Digital Humanities, & Open Education Resources: James Gifford, Nyarai Tawengwa, Peter Mate & Mickey Truong
The Modernist Version Project (MVP) was founded under a three-year (2012–2015) Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Partnership Development Grant for Canadian, American, and Irish universities to produce an online open-access and open-source platform for the digitization, mark-up and manipulation, comparison, collation, annotation, and publication of modernist texts that exist in more than one textual state. With undergraduate research assistants, it produced OER critical editions, TEI encoded editions, or facsimiles of several public domain modernist texts: the complete pirated editions of James Joyce's Ulysses, the 3 major states of Ernest Hemingway's In Our Time, Djuna Barnes' Nightwood, the serial publications of Joseph Conrad's Nostromo, and Dorothy Richardson's The Tunnel and Pointed Roofs, among others, and with more in production. This session presents the workflow of student researchers for the textual production of critical editions, summarizes the MVP whitepaper of best practices, and details preliminary research findings made possible by the Versioning Machine and Voyant/Voyeur digital text analysis portals.


Connecting Text and Data: A Collaborative Teaching Approach to a Literary Network Analysis Project for Undergraduates: Hélène Bilis & Laura M. O'Brien
Introducing students to the study of texts as data can best be accomplished with a collaborative approach. We will describe a partnership between faculty and digital scholarship specialists that leverages overlapping expertise in framing how to think rhetorically and critically about the tools and technology within a disciplinary context. Based on two iterations of a course’s introductory unit on network analysis for literary texts, we will offer strategies for teaching students to ask questions of and make arguments with visualizations of humanities data.







Speakers
HE

Helene Effie Bilis

Wellesley College
avatar for Laura M O'Brien

Laura M O'Brien

Assistant Director for Research Services, Wellesley College


Thursday March 15, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
PAB 104

10:15am

Two Sessions: It Takes a Village: Building and Supporting an Undergraduate Digital Scholarship Fellowship ~|~ Enhancing Undergraduate Digital Research Methods and Skills by Connecting (Co-)curricular Learning Opportunities
 It Takes a Village: Building and Supporting an Undergraduate Digital Scholarship Fellowship: Courtney Paddick & Carrie Pirmann
In summer 2017, Bucknell University launched the Digital Scholarship Summer Research Fellows (DSSRF) program, a librarian-led initiative which introduces students to digital scholarship tools and methodologies, and equips them with the skills necessary to undertake an independent, digitally-based research project. Collaboration is key in supporting the program; the facilitators rely on a model of distributed expertise, drawing on the knowledge and skills of staff across our Library & IT organization to lead workshops on topics such as TEI and data visualization. The fellowship also integrates inter-institutional collaboration, through meet-ups with students and facilitators from similar programs, reinforcing the notion of building a community of practice. 


Enhancing undergraduate digital research methods and skills by connecting  (co-)curricular learning opportunities: Celeste Sharpe, Sarah Calhoun, Austin Mason, & Andrew Wilson
Students at Carleton are increasingly looking for opportunities to learn digital methods and skills that are not yet widespread in the formalized curriculum. Employment opportunities offered by the Humanities Center, Library, and Academic Technology provide a range of co-curricular learning experiences—including front-end and back-end web development, research ethics and accessibility training, and 3D modeling/printing opportunities—that our students can connect to their in-class research and digital project assignments. We will give examples of how we support student learning and research inquiry across the curriculum and how our student workers have leveraged skills learned on the job to enhance their own scholarship.

Speakers
SC

Sarah Calhoun

Carleton College
avatar for Courtney Paddick

Courtney Paddick

Librarian for the Arts and Humanities, Bucknell University
avatar for Carrie Pirmann

Carrie Pirmann

Social Sciences Librarian, Bucknell University
Carrie Pirmann is the Social Sciences Librarian at Bertrand Library, and co-facilitator of Bucknell's Digital Scholarship Summer Research Fellows program. She is not-so-secretly a data geek and enjoys working on digital projects that incorporate mapping and other forms of visuali... Read More →
CS

Celeste Sharpe

Carleton College



Thursday March 15, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
PAB 320

10:15am

Two Sessions: Building an Online Map of the Lewis & Clark Expedition ~|~ Student Editors and Scholars: Creating a Faculty-led and Student-centered Undergraduate Research Journal
Building an Online Map of the Lewis & Clark Expedition: Mark Dahl and William Owen
Lewis & Clark's Watzek Library has been experimenting with strategies for integrating geospatial resources into History scholarship. In this presentation, we will discuss a collaborative project involving library staff and History practicum students devoted to creating an updated online map of the Lewis & Clark Expedition. The students involved in the project are learning about the creative process involved in building a digital resource and developing new technical, research, and writing skills.


Student Editors and Scholars: Creating a Faculty-led and Student-centered Undergraduate Research Journal: Lynn Deeken & Molly Clark Hillard
Seattle University created an undergraduate research journal showcasing full length research articles, short communications (science/social sciences) and lower division writing from our Core curriculum. A ten-credit curriculum includes a pedagogy class and two practicum courses to develop student editors’ ability to form, edit and publish an interdisciplinary journal. Together with several other campus partnerships, the journal collaborated with the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons as part of its new institutional repository and emerging scholarly communications initiative.

Speakers
MD

Mark Dahl

Director of the Watzek Library, Lewis & Clark College
avatar for Molly Clark Hillard

Molly Clark Hillard

Associate Professor of English, Seattle University


Thursday March 15, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
PAB 332

11:00am

Digital Scholarship Compañeros: Digitizing a Human Rights Archive in Guatemala with Librarians, Undergraduates, and Lawyers
Digital Scholarship Compañeros: Digitizing a Human Rights Archive in Guatemala with Librarians, Undergraduates, and Lawyers:  Alex Galarza, Brie Gettleson, Andrew Janco
This session is a roundtable discussion of ways of centering student work and scholarship in the creation of a digital archive by Haverford College’s Magill Library in partnership with the Guatemalan human rights group Grupo de Apoyo Mutuo (GAM). The project is digitizing GAM’s physical archive using a post-custodial method and creating public-facing digital scholarship projects designed to aid in human rights trials and historical memory of Cold War violence in Guatemala. Panelists will explain their roles and then explore the challenges and opportunities of balancing student initiative with the needs of the project and partner organization.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Galarza

Alex Galarza

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Haverford College
avatar for Brie Gettleson

Brie Gettleson

Social Science Librarian, Haverford College


Thursday March 15, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
PAB 104

11:00am

Collaborating in Context: ILiADS as a Platform for Facilitating Undergraduate Digital Scholarship
Collaborating in Context: ILiADS as a Platform for Facilitating Undergraduate Digital Scholarship: Jacob Heil,  Catie Newton, Jon Breitenbucher, Blaire Bosley
My co-presenters and I propose a panel in which we use the backdrop of ILiADS, the Institute for Liberal Arts Digital Scholarship, as a framework for discussing the sustained partnerships between the libraries, educational technology, and student researchers that are necessary for successful (digital) student projects. Jacob Heil will contextualize ILiADS as an opportunity that (like the Reed Workshops, it would seem) encourages inter-divisional teams' participation, including students. Then, Newton and Breitenbucher will speak to their respective roles in partnering in support of students' digital projects: Newton will focus on pre- and post-ILiADS project considerations, while Breitenbucher's focus will be on facilitation during ILIADS.
The presentation slides are available at this link: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1dkXecfAx-urFS_7ulbgN0bWAdmG0COreeZn4sPGkD8U/edit#slide=id.g32334c08b3_0_21



Speakers
avatar for Jon Breitenbucher

Jon Breitenbucher

Director of Educational Technology, The College of Wooster
Dr. Jon Breitenbucher holds a Ph. D in mathematics from The Ohio State University. He has been involved with educational technology in some from since 2001 helping establish The College of Wooster's Moodle and WordPress multisite platforms in the mid-2000s. He is always looking for... Read More →
avatar for Jacob Heil

Jacob Heil

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Dir. of CoRE, College of Wooster
Jacob Heil is the College of Wooster's Digital Scholarship Librarian and the Director of its Collaborative Research Environment (CoRE). Partnering with library colleagues, faculty, and students, he explores digital methods and modalities for teaching and research. He also collaborates... Read More →
avatar for Catie Newton

Catie Newton

Digital Curation Librarian, The College of Wooster


Thursday March 15, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
PAB 320

11:00am

Newbook Digital Texts: New Models for Digital Scholarship and Undergraduate Education
Newbook Digital Texts: New Models for Digital Scholarship and Undergraduate Education: Sarah Ketchley & Walter Andrews and Hannah Jolibois & Jion Yi
Newbook Digital Texts is an innovative digital humanities publishing house re-imagining and restructuring traditional academic research, publication, and education.  Over six years, more than 140 University of Washington undergraduate interns from 33 departments have collaborated with faculty on projects ranging from Ottoman and Georgian poetry to nineteenth-century travel journals from Iraq and Egypt. Our presentation will discuss our strategies for blending the traditional values of the humanities with the development of technological competency, effective communication skills, and the ability to work in a collaborative environment. 

Speakers

Thursday March 15, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
PAB 332

12:00pm

Lunch
Thursday March 15, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

1:30pm

Digital Classics in the Liberal Arts Classroom
Digital Classics in the Liberal Arts Classroom:  Tom Landvatter and Beth Platte
At small liberal arts colleges, classics departments are limited in the number of classes they can offer. As a result, traditional methods for scaffolding scholarly development over multiple terms are often not possible. In this talk, we’ll provide an introduction to digital humanities in classical studies and how digital humanities tools and approaches have been used in undergraduate education in the classics. In particular, we’ll discuss how classical archaeology courses at Reed incorporate digital humanities approaches to student research to foster core competencies in disciplinary thinking and research methodologies. The outcome of this approach is that students both appreciate the complexities of classical archaeology while also making a lasting contribution, through their research, to a major digital humanities project.


Thursday March 15, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
PAB 332

1:30pm

Collaborating to Design Digital Scholarship Syllabi
Collaborating to Design Digital Scholarship Syllabi: Radhika Natarajan, Trina Marmarelli, Angie Beiriger & Samrath Bhattacharya
In the spring of 2017, Radhika Natarajan, Angie Beiriger, and Trina Marmarelli collaborated to support student research and the creation of a digital exhibition in Radhika’s Migration Histories course. In this panel, we will each present our responsibilities in the course--historical content and analysis, metadata, and the Omeka course platform--in order to reflect on the success of the course in terms of student learning. Our panel will include a student who took the course, and close with a discussion that includes the audience. 

Speakers
avatar for Angie Beiriger

Angie Beiriger

Humanities and Digital Scholarship Librarian, Reed College
avatar for Samrath Bhattacharya

Samrath Bhattacharya

Student, Reed College
avatar for Trina Marmarelli

Trina Marmarelli

Director, Instructional Technology Services, Reed College
Trina Marmarelli is director of instructional technology services at Reed College. Her team supports faculty and students in selecting and using digital tools and methods for teaching, learning, and research. During her time at Reed, Trina has been involved in projects ranging from... Read More →
avatar for Radhika Natarajan

Radhika Natarajan

Assistant Professor of History and Humanities, Reed College
I am a historian of Modern Imperial Britain, and I am particularly interested in the long conjuncture produced by social democracy and decolonization. At Reed, I offer courses in British, Imperial, and twentieth century history, and I also teach in the college’s interdisciplinary... Read More →


Thursday March 15, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
PAB 320

1:30pm

Students as Scholars: Digital Scholarship Practice in Disciplinary Undergraduate Work
Students as Scholars: Digital Scholarship Practice in Disciplinary Undergraduate Work: Megan Kudzia and Carin Graves
Our presentation will cover the evolving pedagogical perspectives and practices we’ve used in collaboration with a social work faculty member who was redesigning her final project. Working with upper-division students, we’ve collaboratively transitioned from a paper model to a digital scholarship website project guided by ACRL Framework for Information Literacy. The current assignment encompasses digital rhetorics and multimodal storytelling, as well as optional statistical analysis to prepare students to view themselves as researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Kudzia

Megan Kudzia

Michigan State University



Thursday March 15, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
PAB 104

2:30pm

Break
Thursday March 15, 2018 2:30pm - 2:45pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

2:45pm

Two Sessions: The Evolution of Digitizing Lili Elbe's Man Into Woman ~|~ Babes in the Woods: Peddling Scottish Chapbooks in the Classroom at the University of Guelph
The Evolution of Digitizing Lili Elbe's Man Into Woman: Emily Datskou & Danielle Richards
The Man Into Woman project is the digitization of the 6 editions of Lili Elbe’s Man Into Woman, originally Fra Mand til Kvinde (1931), the first full-length narrative of a subject who undergoes a surgical change in sex. The project began in 2016 and is the result of interdepartmental collaboration that includes NTTs, undergraduates, faculty, university staff, and graduate students. Our presentation will look at the processes of collaboration across departments and media, how to facilitate undergraduate assistance and partnership with faculty and graduate students, and strategies for training individuals of all backgrounds in digital resource and software. 


Babes in the Woods: Peddling Scottish Chapbooks in the Classroom at the University of Guelph: Melissa McAfee
Digital pedagogy and experiential learning projects are a fast growing component of outreach in Archival & Special Collections at the University of Guelph. This presentation will provide an overview of The Scottish Chapbook Project, an experiential learning project that was developed as a partnership between librarians and undergraduate students and faculty in the History Department at the University of Guelph.  Through experiential learning projects with The Scottish Chapbook Project, students have learned how to interpret and contextualize original and primary sources; protocols for using original and digital primary source materials; and how to develop online repositories and curate online exhibits. 

Speakers
avatar for Melissa McAfee

Melissa McAfee

Special Collections Librarian, University of Guelph Library


Thursday March 15, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
PAB 104

2:45pm

Feeding Students’ Curious Appetites: Supporting Research with Emerging Technologies
Feeding Students’ Curious Appetites: Supporting Research with Emerging Technologies: Jon Caris
Students are attracted to burgeoning technologies such as drones, virtual reality, and rapid prototyping. Their interests are often contained in this discovery phase and lack impetus to apply these methods to their own research – not because of a lack of enthusiasm, but rather they have difficulty envisioning the roles these technologies can play in their work. As the Smith College Spatial Analysis Lab accommodates research across disciplines, we are navigating research that manifest in different forms – from traditional data-driven quantitative STEM methods to qualitative storytelling in the humanities. We are leveraging our campus, the Five College area, as well as our neighboring communities to build our intellectual sandbox.


Speakers
avatar for Jon Caris

Jon Caris

Director, Spatial Analysis Lab, Smith College


Thursday March 15, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
PAB 320

3:45pm

Break
Thursday March 15, 2018 3:45pm - 4:00pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

4:00pm

Teaching with Digital Collections (facilitated discussion)
What are best practices for teaching with digital collections? How can we help undergraduates think critically about digital content? We have questions and hope you have answers. Come prepared to share your thoughts and best practices in this interactive session.

Speakers
avatar for Angie Beiriger

Angie Beiriger

Humanities and Digital Scholarship Librarian, Reed College
AD

Annie Downey

Associate College Librarian & Director of Research Services, Reed College Library


Thursday March 15, 2018 4:00pm - 4:45pm
PAB 104

4:00pm

Two Sessions: Thesis Paths to Research ~|~ Particle Physics Research with Undergraduates
Thesis Paths to Research
Joel Franklin
This presentation will discuss the role of the senior thesis in student research at Reed, based on a case study of a recent thesis student who did a wonderful job of turning her thesis into a piece of relevant (if speculative) theoretical physics. A major focus of the talk will be the ways in which the thesis experience, in particular, gave this student (and can give other students) the tools and breadth of study needed to put the pieces together.

Particle Physics Research with Undergraduates
Andrew Larkoski
This presentation will focus on the process of involving undergraduates in research in particle physics, with particular attention to the wide range of resources that allow undergraduates to really get into modern particle physics analyses, such as simulation tools or vetted experimental data, which have a relatively low threshold for students to use. I will also discuss the scope and goals of my research, the required background knowledge, and a few examples of the research I’ve done with undergraduates.

Speakers
JF

Joel Franklin

Reed College
AL

Andrew Larkoski

Reed College


Thursday March 15, 2018 4:00pm - 4:45pm
PAB 320

4:00pm

Sustaining Digital Projects (facilitated discussion)
Join us for an informal discussion of the life cycles of projects, both large and small. As we conclude our Mellon grant, we're thinking about ways to sustain the momentum we gained through our successful collaborations, and hoping others who have been involved in similar initiatives will share their secrets. On a smaller scale, the courses that were involved in the grant have created a wide range of digital projects - what can and should happen to these after the course ends? We also hope to talk about strategies for using qualitative and quantitative data to inform both the beginning (needs assessment) and the end (assessment of impact) of digital projects.

Speakers
avatar for Marianne Colgrove

Marianne Colgrove

Deputy Chief Information Officer & Director, Web Support Services, Reed College
Marianne Colgrove is the Deputy CIO and Director of the Web Support Services department at Reed. She is a past Board Member and Treasurer of the Consortium of Liberal Arts Colleges, and is currently on the Council of the Northwest Academic Computing Consortium.
avatar for Trina Marmarelli

Trina Marmarelli

Director, Instructional Technology Services, Reed College
Trina Marmarelli is director of instructional technology services at Reed College. Her team supports faculty and students in selecting and using digital tools and methods for teaching, learning, and research. During her time at Reed, Trina has been involved in projects ranging from... Read More →


Thursday March 15, 2018 4:00pm - 4:45pm
PAB 332

4:45pm

Lightning Talks
  1. Fostering Creativity and Criticality:  Creating Opportunity for Undergraduate Led Digital Research: Ebadur Rahman  
  2. UX Night School: Creative Inquiry and Design Research (or, Lessons learned from starting and running a school for grownups): Amelia Abreu 
  3. Open Resources for Teaching Data Science Skills: Ted Laderas
    Slides are available here: https://laderast.github.io/data-sci-resources/
  4. Supporting 21st Century Teaching and Research with Digital Collections: Jodi Allison-Bunnell

Speakers
avatar for Amelia Abreu

Amelia Abreu

Amelia Abreu is a design researcher and the founder of UX Night School, a community-based professional skills workshop in Portland, Oregon. As a design researcher, she has worked with teams at Nike, Mozilla, Microsoft Research and Intel, as well as startups and cultural organizations. She holds graduate degrees in Human Computer Interaction and Information Studies from the University of Washington and the University of Texas-Austin. Her work and writing has been featured in The New Inquiry, Motherboard, and Model View Culture and the BBC., UX Night School
avatar for Jodi Allison-Bunnell

Jodi Allison-Bunnell

Program Manager, Orbis Cascade Alliance
I manage the program that supports local and unique content at the Orbis Cascade Alliance's 39 member libraries in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. My portfolio includes digital collections, Encoded Archival Description, archival collection management, and unique materials in our shared... Read More →
avatar for Ted Laderas

Ted Laderas

Postdoctoral Fellow, Oregon Health and Science University
I am a Postdoctoral Researcher at the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute and an instructor in the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology track in the OHSU Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology (BCB/DMICE). My research focus is on the Systems Biology of Complex Diseases... Read More →



Thursday March 15, 2018 4:45pm - 5:30pm
PAB 320

5:30pm

Reception and Dinner
Thursday March 15, 2018 5:30pm - 7:30pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

8:00pm

Shuttle bus from Reed to Mark Spencer
Thursday March 15, 2018 8:00pm - 8:30pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address
 
Friday, March 16
 

8:00am

8:15am

Light breakfast, coffee and tea
Pastries, muffins, fruit, and mini frittatas

Friday March 16, 2018 8:15am - 9:00am
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

9:00am

Two Sessions: Preserving Born-Digital Works: Engaging Undergraduates in Digital Research and Archives Work ~|~ Plotting and Scheming for Student Engagement in Long Term Digital Research
Preserving Born-Digital Works: Engaging Undergraduates in Digital Research and Archives Work: Dene Grigar, Nicholas Schiller
The Electronic Literature Lab at WSU Vancouver has three goals: first to preserve and archive early works of electronic literature, second to provide contemporary audiences with access previously unavailable due to outmoded media, and finally to facilitate scholarly discourses around these works. We have been engaging undergraduate researchers in all three aspects of this work. This presentation will describe how undergraduates are prepared for and assisted in engaging in the scholarly work of born-digital archives.

Plotting and Scheming for Student Engagement in Long Term Digital Research: Kristy Golubiewski-Davis, Jessica Pigza
In 2017, UC Santa Cruz Library’s Digital Scholarship Commons and its Special Collections & Archives challenged themselves to collaborate on creating a new model for student engagement--one with a workflow mindful of the cyclical nature of student work while also offering a means of showcasing the potential of both special collections as well as digital methods for student work. Of critical importance was that students could participate in the full lifecycle of a digital project, from planning conversations through creative work contributions, and experience the complexities and the potential of digital resources in conversation with primary sources. The speakers have worked together over the past year to meet this challenge, and they will share what they learned while collaborating on the first iteration of this experimental approach, which focused on exploring the research possibilities of a collection of early 20th c. hand colored lantern slides and lecture notes of itinerant speaker Branson DeCou.

Speakers
avatar for Dene Grigar

Dene Grigar

Professor and Director, Washington State University Vancouver
Dene Grigar is President of the Electronic Literature Organization. A Professor and Director of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver, her research focuses on the creation, curation, preservation, and criticism of Electronic Literature... Read More →
avatar for Jessica Pigza

Jessica Pigza

Outreach & Exhibits Librarian for Special Collections & Archives, UC Santa Cruz
avatar for Nicholas Schiller

Nicholas Schiller

Librarian and Professor, Electronic Literature Lab @ WSU Vancouver
Nicholas Schiller is the Associate Director of the Electronic Literature Lab, teaches in the Creative Media and Digital Culture program and is a member of the library faculty at Washington State University Vancouver.



Friday March 16, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
PAB 104

9:00am

Two Sessions: Visualizing Scholarship: Teaching Historiography in the Digital Age ~|~ Senior Thesis Students’ Work with Primary Sources
Visualizing Scholarship: Teaching Historiography in the Digital Age: Pamella Lach
Historiography -- the methodological conversations historians have with each other about the interpretation of evidence to produce new knowledge -- is challenging for students to master; yet they cannot progress through their historical training without acquiring this foundational research-based skill. New digital tools for visualizing historical knowledge, from timeline and mapping tools to network-analysis platforms, can be leveraged to provide hands-on opportunities for students to learn about and actively engage in historiography. This presentation will detail the positive impact of a recent collaboration between a Digital Humanities Librarian and a History professor at San Diego State University to scaffold digital tools in a historical methods class, and share ideas for growing digital assignments in the future.
Presentation slides are available at this link: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1l0brkd1TprjFRD3RmX7B2kGh2vZjJ6pESzE2OcwpPzo/edit#slide=id.p3

Senior Thesis Students’ Work with Primary Sources: Margaret Schaus & Meaghan Ryan
All Haverford seniors do extensive research to write a thesis in their major.  Librarians and faculty work with history students to identify key primary sources and to build a context for a nuanced interpretation.  From 2010-2016 Haverford librarians interviewed and surveyed History students and faculty to better understand what contributed to students’ success with using primary sources online and in archives.

Speakers
PL

Pamella Lach

Digital Humanities Librarian, San Diego State University
avatar for Margaret Schaus

Margaret Schaus

Lead Research and Instruction Librarian, Haverford College
Instruction and assessment. New article co-authored by Terry Snyder and Margaret Schaus appearing in Portal in April 2018.Editor of Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index - 40,000+ records including images with descriptions, analysis and metadata.


Friday March 16, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
PAB 320

9:00am

Two Sessions: Data Science Workshops for Undergraduate Students ~|~ LCphysX: Teaching Undergraduates Multi-Media Science Communication Skills for Public Outreach
Data Science Workshops for Undergraduate Students: Nicole Vasilevsky
There is an increasing demand for data science skills across disciplines. To address this need, members of the OHSU Library offered several hands-on, in person workshops to teach basic skills in data science to undergraduate students. In this session, I will describe successes and lessons learned from our “Data and Donuts” workshops and the OHSU Library Data Science Institute.

 LCphysX: Teaching Undergraduates Multi-Media Science Communication Skills for Public Outreach: Parvaneh Abbaspour & Jeremy McWilliams
LCphysX is a web-based platform designed with the primary purpose of teaching undergraduate physics majors multi-media science communication skills. The prevalence of the internet has exacerbated the need to train future scientists to communicate with a popular audience using digital media. Developed through a partnership between the Library Digital Initiatives Team and Physics Department at Lewis and Clark College, LCphysX features short, student-produced videos which present projects and experiments from upper-level lab courses in language accessible to a general public.
Links: LCPhysX | Video Making Guide


Speakers
PA

Parvaneh Abbaspour

Science & Data Services Librarian, Lewis & Clark College
avatar for Jeremy McWilliams

Jeremy McWilliams

Digital Services Coordinator, Lewis & Clark College
Programming, LAMP stack stuff, Omeka, Wordpress.
avatar for Nicole Vasilevsky

Nicole Vasilevsky

Lead Biocurator, OHSU



Friday March 16, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
PAB 332

9:45am

Coffee Break
Friday March 16, 2018 9:45am - 10:00am
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address

10:00am

Foundational Concepts for Working on Digital Projects
Foundational Concepts for Working on Digital Projects: Dana Bronson, Ben Murphy & Amy Blau
At Whitman College’s Penrose Library, we teach credit-bearing library classes that introduce students to working with primary sources (physically and digitally), and also teach concepts necessary to understanding the digital, broadly construed. That is, what do students need to know about the social, political, and economic aspects of different digital tools and systems in order to use or develop them effectively? We offer three credit-bearing courses in the library, one of which is taught in the Archives and Special Collections, that do not build as a sequence, but rather allow students a range of entry points that emphasize different aspects of primary source research, and different concepts relating to digital studies. Overall, our instruction program aims to introduce crucial research skills that will help students throughout their academic careers, with attention to concepts needed for students to be efficient producers and consumers of information.

Speakers
AB

Amy Blau

Instructional and Data Services Librarian, Whitman College
Research data management, digital humanities, Yiddish
avatar for Dana Bronson

Dana Bronson

Whitman College and Northwest Archives
BM

Ben Murphy

Archivist and Head of Digital Services, Whitman College


Friday March 16, 2018 10:00am - 11:00am
PAB 104

10:00am

Designing Inquiry-Based Research, from Quantitative to Visual Literacies
Designing Inquiry-Based Research, from Quantitative to Visual Literacies: Christopher Gilman and Jacob Alden Sargent
Liberal arts colleges face pressure around educational cost and value, the professional specialization of the professoriate, and a proliferation of technologies, tools and information beyond what small colleges can collect and provide to students. In this context, institutions may question their general education mission and its long standing focus on common experiences, great books, and writing-centric curricula, without clear direction on what all students should be able to do or know by the time they graduate.
At our institution, we are collaborating with faculty to explore and support inquiry-based curriculum design that fosters undergraduate research competencies for all students prior to their disciplinary specialization. We see inquiry-based course design, and the utilization of digital collaboration and communication tools, as a common thread that can unite various campus interests in equipping students to become leaders in their civic lives and careers. Through various grant-funded programs, co-curricular programs, and library research workshops, we seek to embed multiple literacies (or meta-literacies), such as quantitative, visual, computational, geospatial etc., into the general curriculum in ways that complement and support disciplinary research. We suggest that students’ abilities to ask questions, seek relevant information, analyze information, and communicate their results can be best cultivated in collaborative research environments where professors create inductive and open spaces for learning.


Speakers
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Christopher Gilman

Occidental College
Chris Gilman is Associate Director for Design + Development in the Center for Digital Liberal Arts, and Affiliated Faculty in Comparative Studies in Literature and Culture at Occidental College. He has a PhD in Slavic languages and literatures and a BA in Russian studies. His professional... Read More →
JA

Jacob Alden Sargent

Occidental College
Jacob Alden Sargent is an Associate Director for Instruction and Research in the Center for Digital Liberal Arts at Occidental College.


Friday March 16, 2018 10:00am - 11:00am
PAB 320

10:00am

Zine Remediations: Student-Centered Experiential Learning, Faculty-Librarian Collaborations & the Possibilities of (Digital) Critical Pedagogy
Zine Remediations: Student-Centered Experiential Learning, Faculty-Librarian Collaborations & the Possibilities of (Digital) Critical Pedagogy: Crystal Baik & Robin Katz
In this presentation, our team will share their hands-on experience in facilitating a group-oriented research project centering student experiential learning, primary and born digital sources, faculty-librarian collaborations, and (digital) critical pedagogy. Specifically, discussants will walk through a final group project-- a "zine" collaboration-- implemented during an ethnic studies lecture course in Spring 2017 ("Introduction to Asian American Studies"). Scaffolded across a 7-week period, students worked with an extensive collection of zines in UCR Library’s special collections while creating their own zines that grapple with the skewed representations of Asian Americans within popular media and dominant scholarship. While the exercise proved to be generative, it also elicited a myriad of key questions that foreground other possibilities and pathways of learning for future iterations of the exercise (i.e., better integration of student-blogging; critical explorations of media "circulation" especially as zines are digitally created and/or archived online for a broader public; digital curatorship of student-created primary resources; and more extensive collaborations among faculty, librarians, and educational technology).

Speakers
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Crystal Baik

Assistant Professor, Department of Gender & Sexuality
RK

Robin Katz

UC Riverside


Friday March 16, 2018 10:00am - 11:00am
PAB 332

11:00am

Reed Faculty Panel: Collaboration in Context
Partnerships between faculty members, instructional technology staff, and librarians to design new courses or redesign existing courses were a central part of our grant project. In this session, three faculty partners—a historian, a musicologist, and a statistician—will discuss the collaborative process, its outcomes, and how it has influenced their teaching beyond the specific courses involved in the grant project.

Speakers
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Andrew Bray

Reed College
ML

Morgan Luker

Reed College
avatar for Radhika Natarajan

Radhika Natarajan

Assistant Professor of History and Humanities, Reed College
I am a historian of Modern Imperial Britain, and I am particularly interested in the long conjuncture produced by social democracy and decolonization. At Reed, I offer courses in British, Imperial, and twentieth century history, and I also teach in the college’s interdisciplinary... Read More →


Friday March 16, 2018 11:00am - 11:45am
PAB 320

11:45am

Wrap-up & Closing Remarks
Friday March 16, 2018 11:45am - 12:00pm
PAB 320

12:00pm

Shuttle bus from Reed to Mark Spencer
Friday March 16, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
PAB 1st Floor Foyer address